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DEM EYELASHES

Source: pepperandpals
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pepperandpals:

femshoni:

And so it begins. 

BANDIT! Birds do love glasses.

Wonderful! A happy outcome for Bandit the conure. (I signal-boosted his fundraiser last week.)

Source: femshoni
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SO ENDEARING ;_;
That’s like a little “I love you” in cockatiel-speak—heartwings and a chirp.

SO ENDEARING ;_;

That’s like a little “I love you” in cockatiel-speak—heartwings and a chirp.

Source: pepperandpals
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poetsorg:

From “Knowledge” by Louise Bogan:

Trees make a long shadow
And a light sound

 

Source: poets.org
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theepiscopalchurch:

Evening Prayer: Easter Monday ~ Janet Morley, Anglican Liturgist

Source: theepiscopalchurch
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tunama:

I’ll poop on your food and pluck your eyebrows and eyelashes

AND YOU WILL ADORE ME ANYWAY

(via yousuredolovecock)

Source: tunama
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blacksmokeistheanswer:

Merlin is aware he lives in England

(via yousuredolovecock)

Source: blacksmokeistheanswer
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uselesspony:

The Myth of the Flat Earth:
I thought that I’d take the time to correct a popular misconception.  I’ve often heard it claimed that the Medieval Church taught that the earth was flat, or that people throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance could be persecuted for believing that the earth was round.
The trouble with this is that it isn’t even true.  The only reason people think that it is true is because it’s been referenced so many times in popular culture that people start to believe it is factual.
The idea of a spherical earth was first suggested by Pythagoras.  In the words of Diogenes Laertius: “[Pythagoras ] was the first [Greek] who called the earth round; though Theophrastus attributes this to Parmenides, and Zeno to Hesiod.”  Plato also taught that the earth was round: “My conviction is that the earth is a round body in the centre of the heavens, and therefore has no need of air or of any similar force to be a support”.
By the time of the Middle Ages it was no different.  The monk Bede describes “the roundness of the Earth, for not without reason is it called ‘the orb of the world’ on the pages of Holy Scripture and of ordinary literature. It is, in fact, set like a sphere in the middle of the whole universe.”  That the earth was a sphere was known by Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, Chaucer, Dante, and many others.  In the words of historian Jeffrey Burton Russell: “with extraordinary few exceptions no educated person in the history of Western Civilization from the third century B.C. onward believed that the earth was flat”.  And according to historians David Lindberg and Ronald Numbers: “there was scarcely a Christian scholar of the Middle Ages who did not acknowledge [Earth’s] sphericity and even know its approximate circumference”.
The prevailing view of the cosmos in those days was the Ptolemaic system, which has the spherical earth surrounded by various heavens in which the planets revolve, then finally the stars, and beyond that the Empyrean Heaven where God dwells beyond space and time.  This system can be seen in Medieval maps of the cosmos, such as the one above.  There are plenty more examples that can be found just by Googling ‘Medieval cosmos’.



Thank you! The erroneous belief that people believed in a flat earth until the Renaissance is one of my pet peeves. I read Dante for the first time as a teenager: He sure as hell knew better.

uselesspony:

The Myth of the Flat Earth:

I thought that I’d take the time to correct a popular misconception.  I’ve often heard it claimed that the Medieval Church taught that the earth was flat, or that people throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance could be persecuted for believing that the earth was round.

The trouble with this is that it isn’t even true.  The only reason people think that it is true is because it’s been referenced so many times in popular culture that people start to believe it is factual.

The idea of a spherical earth was first suggested by Pythagoras.  In the words of Diogenes Laertius: “[Pythagoras ] was the first [Greek] who called the earth round; though Theophrastus attributes this to Parmenides, and Zeno to Hesiod.”  Plato also taught that the earth was round: “My conviction is that the earth is a round body in the centre of the heavens, and therefore has no need of air or of any similar force to be a support”.

By the time of the Middle Ages it was no different.  The monk Bede describes “the roundness of the Earth, for not without reason is it called ‘the orb of the world’ on the pages of Holy Scripture and of ordinary literature. It is, in fact, set like a sphere in the middle of the whole universe.”  That the earth was a sphere was known by Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, Chaucer, Dante, and many others.  In the words of historian Jeffrey Burton Russell: “with extraordinary few exceptions no educated person in the history of Western Civilization from the third century B.C. onward believed that the earth was flat”.  And according to historians David Lindberg and Ronald Numbers: “there was scarcely a Christian scholar of the Middle Ages who did not acknowledge [Earth’s] sphericity and even know its approximate circumference”.

The prevailing view of the cosmos in those days was the Ptolemaic system, which has the spherical earth surrounded by various heavens in which the planets revolve, then finally the stars, and beyond that the Empyrean Heaven where God dwells beyond space and time.  This system can be seen in Medieval maps of the cosmos, such as the one above.  There are plenty more examples that can be found just by Googling ‘Medieval cosmos’.

Picture from a 1550 edition of On the Sphere of the World

Thank you! The erroneous belief that people believed in a flat earth until the Renaissance is one of my pet peeves. I read Dante for the first time as a teenager: He sure as hell knew better.

(via hodie-scolastica)

Source: uselesspony
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pepperandpals:

So I’m getting ready to move, which involves going through my things and packing stuff up. In the process, I found a picture I drew of Pepper when I was five.

OMG DYING OF CUTE

I’ve had my boy Rembrandt since I was in my thirties, and he was not my first bird. I cannot imagine what it must be like to grow up alongside an intelligent, sensitive parrot; I feel like Pepper and his blogger must be even closer than Rembrandt and I, but I can’t imagine *how*….

Source: pepperandpals
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retrobaltimore:

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[Photo by Thomas C. Scilipoti, 1956]

Years before Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s current proposal for cleaner city streets, a squadron of uniformed street sweepers who were called “hokey men” did the job. Their numbers dwindled in the late 1990s, when they finally faded away into Baltimore history, a century after their founding.

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I have a feeling, a vague memory, that my grandfather held this job for a while. He did a number of things; I think the job he held longest was driving a delivery truck (or wagon?) for a local brewery.

Source: retrobaltimore
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scales-and-fangs:

This fabulous creature is The Blue Sea Slug (Glaucus atlanticus)

I actually thought that first pic was a piece of jewelry reproducing an unusual creature. It’s so sparkly!

(via oddmodout)

Source: scales-and-fangs
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Avoid the meta and the fighting—in fact, stop paying attention to the show—and I can even enjoy the slash again. Along with various het pairings.